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What is Microsoft Azure Cloud Storage

Microsoft Azure Cloud consists of three main components. The first is something called the fabric. The fabric is the abstract set of compute resources in the data center. Inside are many computers running virtual machines running Windows.

The second component is the storage service. The Azure Cloud Storage service is there to help your application manage all of its data in a reliable and scalable way. The third component is the developer experience.

Microsoft Azure Cloud packages all of this. The fabric, the storage, all of the API’s in the cloud. It adds some integration with visual studio and it delivers it to you in the form of an SDK that you can download for free and run on your desktop. This means you can develop and test your application locally before you deploy to the cloud.

Scaling with Microsoft Azure Cloud Storage

If you’re like most application owners, you’re hoping that your application scales in the cloud as you go. If you have to pay up front for the resources you were going to use at the peak, you’d be wasting a lot of resources that you don’t need.

Microsoft Azure Cloud takes a different approach and this model should be familiar to you because you use it each and every day when you turn on the lights in your house. The electricity goes into your home is a utility and utility means that you pay for it only when you use it. When you turn on the electricity you start paying and as soon as you turn it off you stop.

With Azure Cloud Storage Pay only for What You Need When Need it

If we apply that same notion to the computing resources in our data centers we arrive at the Microsoft Azure Cloud model. The utility model where you pay for only what you need in only when you use it. With that model you can stop worrying about where your peak is. You can stop paying for things up front and you can save a lot of money.

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